Market Commentary

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Total Return Taxable Fixed Income: 4Q 2018 Review

Author: Daniel Himelberger, Post Date: January 2, 2019
Cumberland Advisors - Dan Himelberger - Portfolio Manager & Fixed Income Analyst

After a poor start to the quarter, the Treasury market rebounded nicely over the month of December, providing positive performance across the Treasury curve as the equity market suffered from negative sentiment pertaining to geopolitical risk and concerns over the Fed’s path towards raising short-term interest rates. Political bickering over building “the wall” and threats […]

Cumberland Advisors Week in Review (Dec 24, 2018 – Dec 28, 2018)

Author: Cumberland Advisors, Post Date: December 29, 2018
Week In Review

The Cumberland Advisors Week in Review is a recap of news, commentary, and opinion from our team. These are not revised assessments, and circumstances may have changed in the market from the time of original publication. We also include older commentaries that our editors have determined may be of interest to our audience. Your feedback […]

4Q2018 Review: Munis Turn It Around

Author: John R. Mousseau, CFA, Post Date: December 28, 2018
Market Commentary - Cumberland Advisors - 4Q2018 Review Munis Turn It Around

Muni yields rose in the first six weeks of this quarter – mostly in sympathy with US Treasuries (UST). We saw the 10-year and 30-year Treasury bonds rise 20 and 25 basis points respectively. Since early November, AAA muni yields (AAA) have dropped across the board, and the 10-year Treasury yield has fallen a whopping […]

Yogi Berra, the Fed’s Balance Sheet, and Liquidity

Author: Robert Eisenbeis, Ph.D., Post Date:
Market Commentary - Cumberland Advisors - Yogi Berra, the Fed’s Balance Sheet, and Liquidity - The Fed’s Quantitative Easing Program

The story is that the Fed’s quantitative easing program injected large amounts of liquidity into financial markets, causing bond rates to fall and stock prices to accelerate. Consequently, the argument goes that, the shrinking of the Fed’s balance sheet through maturity runoff will cause bond rates to increase and, presumably, stock prices to retreat. But […]

More Evidence Supporting a 60/40 Portfolio

Author: Gabriel Hament, Post Date: December 24, 2018
More Evidence Supporting a 60/40 Portfolio

Earlier this summer we wrote about the FY 2017 returns (July 1, 2016 – June 31, 2017) reported in the NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments® (NCSE).[1] The research comprises over 800 college and universities that self-reported their performance results and general asset allocation schema. One of the main “takeaways” from the study is that those endowments […]

Happy Holidays!

Author: John R. Mousseau, CFA, Post Date:
Cumberland Holiday Greetings 2018

We wish all the best to our readers and friends for the holidays. We hope you enjoy some great days with your families and friends and look forward to a prosperous 2019. We wish a great new year for all of you and particularly those less fortunate. And hope everyone in their own ways helps […]

Cumberland Advisors Week in Review (Dec 17, 2018 – Dec 21, 2018)

Author: , Post Date: December 22, 2018
Week In Review

The Cumberland Advisors Week in Review is a recap of news, commentary, and opinion from our team. These are not revised assessments, and circumstances may have changed in the market from the time of original publication. We also include older commentaries that our editors have determined may be of interest to our audience. Your feedback […]

Cumberland Advisors Market Commentary by David Kotok

Stock Market and Tariff Truce

We constantly get email defending the Trump-Navarro Trade War policy. The critics outnumber the defenders, but we can observe that both sides of this debate are digging in their heels.

Market-Commentary-Cumberland-Advisors-Trade

We also get counterarguments that ask why we should permit China to steal our intellectual property. Simple answer is, we shouldn’t let any country or business or individual steal. Theft deserves punishment.

Our point is the Trump Trade War took the issue of tariffs and made it less targeted and more macro. In doing so POTUS introduced confusing elements. Example: What do soybeans have in common with algorithms? Or why put a tariff on a washing machine and invite a counter-tariff on an exported Maine lobster?

We also note that there is a time lag as tariff rhetoric segues to tariff threat to tariff notice period to actual imposition to resulting price changes. The full period of this process is about a year. So higher prices for US consumers today had their genesis almost a year ago.

Here is an example from Bloomberg that applies to consumers: “$1 Billion a Month: The Cost of Trump’s Tariffs on Technology” (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-12-14/-1-billion-a-month-the-cost-of-trump-s-tariffs-on-technology). Readers may note the timing depicted in the chart. And perhaps reader critics will appreciate how tariffs levied on China are really a sales and use tax on Americans.

China is realizing that their retaliation with tariffs is having an internal negative effect. Chinese policy is now changing because growth is slowing in China and credit-cycle pressure is rising.

Will Trump-Navarro Trade War team members realize that the US is also experiencing pressure and alter policy to take advantage of the present opportunity for negotiation? We shall soon know.

I really don’t care whether Trump declares himself brilliant and victorious in his Trade War. I really don’t care about the inner workings of Xi and his government. But their respective political self interests could make for a trade truce deal, and I do care about that.

I care about resumption of growth and global exchanges that create more investment and opportunities for entrepreneurs, as well as lower risk of war. It takes statesmen to lead and reach agreement. We will soon know if we have them in Beijing and Washington.

Meanwhile, markets wait, investors wait, business waits, employees wait, credit market agents wait. All have their patience tested in China and in the US and in the rest of world, as tariff-induced inflation pressures and growth-impairment pressures continue to build.

We expect a truce deal. If we’re wrong, the performance of our equity portfolios will suffer. If we’re right, the performance of our equity portfolios will perform well, with good reasons for doing so. The arguable trading range on this outcome is 2400 low on S&P 500 on bad outcomes and 3300–3400 on good outcomes. We think the odds favor the upside, with a time horizon of 12–18 months. We see $172–175 in 2019 earnings for the S&P. We see $180–182 for 2020. Those figures assume that a truce or at least some improvement in the US-China Trade War is coming.

Market Backlash

Author: Robert Eisenbeis, Ph.D., Post Date: December 21, 2018
Cumberland Advisors' Bob Eisenbeis

The Treasury market had priced in a 25-basis-point increase in the FOMC’s target range for federal funds prior to the FOMC’s December 18–19 meeting. The Committee was faced with essentially three policy options: Pause, deliver on the 25-basis-point increase and signal a pause, or deliver on the 25-basis-point increase and signal the willingness to continue […]

Is Climate Warming Creating More Dangerous Hurricanes?

Author: Bob Bunting, Post Date:

Two Hard-Hitting Hurricane Seasons Last year was a September to remember in the US as far as hurricanes go. First, Harvey hit Texas with 130-mph winds and thundering rains totaling up to 60 inches in places, setting all-time US rainfall records. Next, Irma created havoc across the Caribbean and Florida as the strongest Atlantic hurricane […]

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Cumberland Advisors® is registered with the SEC under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. All information contained herein is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a solicitation or offer to sell securities or investment advisory services. Such an offer can only be made in the states where Cumberland Advisors is either registered or is a Notice Filer or where an exemption from such registration or filing is available. New accounts will not be accepted unless and until all local regulations have been satisfied. This presentation does not purport to be a complete description of our performance or investment services. Please feel free to forward our commentaries (with proper attribution) to others who may be interested. It is not our intention to state or imply in any manner that past results and profitability is an indication of future performance. All material presented is compiled from sources believed to be reliable. However, accuracy cannot be guaranteed.
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